Orlando Magic Overview News, Rumors, Scores, Stats, Roster, History & More

Orlando Magic Overview: News, Rumors, Scores, Stats, Roster, History & More

The Orlando Magic Overview is an upcoming professional basketball team that will play its home games at the Amway Center in Orlando, Florida. The NBA Magic player announced the team on November 5, 2016. 

The team’s head coach is all around Excessive IV, and the team’s starting five will be filled with players from various teams in the class. The top two finishers in the overall US Open Cup will be the Playoffs participating teams. The Orlando Magic will be able to yank the 2nd place teams in the overall US Open Cup from the Playoffs.

Orlando Magic

Orlando Magic

American basketball team

Orlando Magic is an American professional basketball club headquartered in Orlando, Florida, that competes in the National Basketball Association’s Eastern Conference (NBA). The Magic have won two Eastern Conference championships (1995, 2009).

The club and the Minnesota Timberwolves became an expansion team in the NBA in 1989-90. The Magic’s play was lackluster for the first three years, and the club had losing records, but the Magic began a remarkable turnaround when it picked center Shaquille O’Neal with the first overall choice in the 1992 NBA draft.

The Magic, led by O’Neal, added 20 victories to their previous season total in his first season, finishing with a 41-41 record and a tie for the last playoff spot in the Eastern Conference, which they lost in a tiebreaker with the Indiana Pacers.

The lost tiebreaker was fortunate in that it placed the Magic in the 1993 draft lottery, which the Magic won despite having a 1.5 percent chance of getting the first overall pick. The franchise traded their first-round pick, Chris Webber, for the third-round pick, point guard Anfernee (“Penny”) Hardaway, and future draft selections.

The youthful Magic club made its first playoff appearance in 1993-94, a feat it surpassed in 1994-95 by reaching the NBA championships in its sixth year. The Orlando Magic were swept in four games by the Houston Rockets, but the team’s future appeared bright.

However, at the end of the 1995-96 season, O’Neal signed the richest free-agent contract in NBA history with the Los Angeles Lakers, leaving Orlando without a prominent player. The Magic went through a run of regular-season dominance followed by postseason defeats in the first round, during which the organization dealt away the injury-prone Hardaway in 1999.

In 2003-04, Orlando had the worst record in the league, but the team won the draft lottery again at the end of the season. The Magic used their first-round pick to choose high-school center Dwight Howard, who supplied the low-post domination the team had needed since O’Neal’s departure, and the Magic launched yet another comeback.

In 2007-08, the Magic recruited free-agent forwards Hedo Turkoglu and Rashard Lewis,

In 2007-08, the Magic recruited free-agent forwards Hedo Turkoglu and Rashard Lewis, and the club advanced to the second round of the playoffs. During the 2008-09 season, the Magic advanced to the NBA finals for the second time, this time losing in five games to the Los Angeles Lakers. Turkoglu left the club the next off-season, but the Magic enjoyed another successful season in 2009-10 before losing to the Boston Celtics in the Eastern Conference finals.

During the 2011-12 season, Howard began openly requesting a trade, and he was eventually transferred to the Lakers in August 2012. The rebuilt Magic subsequently finished with the poorest record in the NBA (20-62) in 2012-13, the first of five consecutive last-place divisional finishes for the troubled team.

In 2018-19, new head coach Steve Clifford led the Magic to an unexpected division title and a first-round playoff exit. The club duplicated that playoff performance in 2019-20, but an injury-plagued 2020-21 season saw the team deal away many of its key contributors and finish with the NBA’s third-worst record, prompting the franchise and Clifford to split ways at the end of the season.

Team Identity

Team Identity

Logos and uniforms

Wordmark logo (2008–present)

The initial Magic outfits were designed by Orlando advertising agency The Advertising Works, overseen by president Doug Minear. Following talks with Walt Disney World artists and over 5000 proposals from throughout the country, the design, which has a basketball surrounded by stars and the wordmark “Magic” with a star replacing the A, was created.

When the logo was updated in 2000 to include a comet-like basketball, stars remained a prominent part. Pat Williams proposed utilizing the colors of his alma mater, Wake Forest. However, this was rejected due to various circumstances, including the nearby college UCF using the same design.

Black would remain the major color in Minear’s scheme, as for 16 other NBA clubs. Other hues included an electric blue custom-made by sports goods company MacGregor and silver. The home jerseys were white with black pinstripes and black numbers with blue trim, while the away jerseys were inverted with “Orlando” instead of the Magic emblem.

Because the NBA’s regular mesh nylon did not allow for pinstripes, the jerseys were made of durene, a cotton material on the inside, and polyester glued on the outside. In 1994-95, the road uniform was modified to blue with white pinstripes, with alternating black outfits.

For Magic’s tenth anniversary in 1998-99, fashion designer Jhane Barnes revealed a new appearance. The pinstripes were removed, and the outfits were redesigned with stars as the background. The Magic emblem appeared on both jerseys, which were constructed of the dazzle used in Women’s National Basketball Association uniforms, with the home jersey in white and the away jersey in blue.

Logos and uniforms

The Magic’s 15th anniversary in 2003-04 prompted another uniform redesign, this time opting for a cleaner appearance devoid of stripes and stars. The home jerseys were white, with a blue Magic emblem with silver and black trim.

The away shirt was blue and restored to the city name. The numerals and emblem are white with a black accent. The team’s original pinstripe jerseys were worn as alternates yearly: black in 2003-04 and 2006-07, blue in 2004-05, and white in 2005-06.

The Magic have released new jerseys for the 2008-09 season. The Magic wore pinstriped jerseys to mark the team’s 20th anniversary. The current design incorporates aspects from Magic’s previous three uniform designs during its 20-year history.

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The home jerseys have silver pinstripes, while the away jerseys have blue pinstripes. The typeface used for the number and player/team names has also been modernized. The shorts and back of the shirt have different Magic logos. This is the franchise’s fourth model.

When the Magic relocated to the Amway Center in 2010, they introduced a new logo that, for the first time, fully read “Magic,” sans the star in place of the A. They also debuted a black alternative kit with silver pinstripes that matched the standard blue road outfit. As part of the NBA Hardwood Classics program, they were mainly worn as throwback uniforms.

Every March, a uniform variant is worn for Noche Latina, with ‘Orlando’ replacing ‘El Magic,’ with ‘El‘ in black and silver trim and ‘Magic‘ in blue and silver trim. This was first seen during the 2011-12 season.

Magic debuted a silver suit for the first time in 2014. It was sleeveless, with white pinstripes and blue, black, and white trim for the letters and numerals. Unlike the previous three uniforms, the sides will have a distinct striping design.

The Magic debuted a third alternative suit in 2016, with carbon as the predominant color and no pinstripes. It was called “Stars,” and it featured the team’s secondary emblem, a blue, white, and blue tricolor stripe in front, and white text.

When Nike became the league’s uniform provider in 2017, the Magic made only a few minor changes to their jerseys. The Magic donned white “Association” uniforms, blue “Icon” uniforms, and black “Statement” uniforms from 2017 to 2019. The set was very identical to the previous Adidas set, with the exception of the black uniforms omitting the blue side stripes and altering the pinstripe colors from silver to blue.

2019-20

The black uniform became the “Icon” uniform for the 2019-20 season, while a new blue outfit functioned as the “Statement.” The uniform was influenced by the many sets used by the Magic throughout the years, including the silver star and black stripes with white pinstripes from 1989-98 and the cleaner design of the 2003-08 set. The “Statement” jerseys would include Jordan Brand’s Jumpman emblem beginning in 2020-21. Disney is the jersey’s sponsor.

Nike also produces an annual “City” edition to highlight either local culture or team tradition. The Magic’s 2017-18 “City” jersey included a printed pattern of stars in the sky on the front and the team’s alternative logo. The Magic made only minor adjustments to their “City” uniform for the 2018-19 season, with the printed star design relegated to the sides and a mostly black basis.

The City uniforms for 2019-20 were “anthracite” (gray) with orange writing. The orange color is a nod to Florida’s citrus industry. The Magic’s 2020-21 “City” jersey retained the orange concept but had a white base, orange letters, and numbers with anthracite trim.

The outfit also respects the old uniforms from 1989 to 1998, with “Orl” beside an anthracite star and orange pinstripes in its original typeface. When the jersey colors are reversed, the exact color scheme utilized in Orlando’s original jerseys is revealed. The Magic returned to the orange concept for its “City” suit in the 2021-22 season, with a few features from prior outfits.

The Magic were awarded an “Earned” jersey after qualifying for the 2020 NBA playoffs the previous year. The white base design included the alternate logo in front (a nod to the 2016-17 “Stars” alternate and 2017-19 “City” uniform) and blue numbers with black and silver trim. The star’s design on the side panels was a nod to the blue uniforms worn from 1998 to 2003.

For the 2018-19 season, the Magic are one of seven clubs that will wear “Classic” jerseys. The club debuted a uniform identical to those used from 1994 to 1998 for their 30th-anniversary celebration.

Mascot

Mascot

Since 1989, Stuff the Magic Dragon has served as the Magic’s mascot. His name is a joke on Puff the Magic Dragon and how a slam dunk is sometimes known as “stuffing.” He was developed by Wade Harrison and Bonnie Erickson of Acme Mascots, Inc.

Home arenas

Amway Center

Amway Center

The Amway Center, the team’s current home arena, opened on October 1, 2010. On October 10, the Orlando Magic staged their first preseason game at Amway Center versus the New Orleans Hornets. The Magic won both games in the 2010-11 regular season home opener against the Washington Wizards on October 28. The Amway Center hosted the All-Star Weekend in 2012.

The new Amway Center had the NBA’s largest Jumbotron when it first debuted. The arena also has around 2,100 feet (640 m) of digital ribbon boards, and motorists going on Interstate 4 can see a 46 feet (14 m) by 53 feet (16 m) video display outside the structure.

The Amway Center also serves as the home of the Orlando Solar Bears of the minor league hockey league and the Orlando Predators of the National Arena League (NAL).

Amway Arena (former arena)

Amway Arena (former arena)

The Amway Arena, formerly known as the Orlando Arena and then the TD Waterhouse Center, was the home of the Orlando Magic from 1989 until 2010.

Amway Arena opened its doors in 1989 and was the home of the Orlando Magic from its establishment until the 2009-2010 season. During its first ten years, it was known as the Orlando Arena or the “O-Rena.” TD Waterhouse bought the naming rights in 1999, and the arena was renamed the TD Waterhouse Center.

Amway obtained the naming rights for four years in December 2006. It also hosts the Arena Football League’s Orlando Predators, the Major Indoor Soccer League’s Orlando Sharks, and various athletic and entertainment events. Amway Arena was one of “The Orlando Venues” that the City of Orlando owned and operated.

The other amenities include the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center, Tinker Field, Camping World Stadium, Harry P. Leu Gardens, and Mennello Museum.

Rivalries

Miami Heat

Miami Heat

The Orlando Magic and the Miami Heat rivalry was known as the Sunshine State rivalry since both teams were based in Florida. Another factor in the rivalry was the presence of high-caliber players on both teams, such as Shaquille O’Neal and Penny Hardaway in Orlando and Alonzo Mourning and Tim Hardaway in Miami. They first met in the NBA playoffs in 1997, with Miami defeating Orlando 3-2; they have not met in the playoffs since.

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The rivalry intensified with the rising stardom of Dwyane Wade and Dwight Howard in Miami and Orlando, as well as Miami’s acquisition of high-caliber stars such as LeBron James from the Cleveland Cavaliers and Chris Bosh from the Toronto Raptors in 2010, resulting in fierce competition between the two.

The rivalry lessened after Dwight Howard left the Magic for the Los Angeles Lakers in August 2012. The Orlando Magic are rebuilding, but competition remains fierce.

Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta Hawks

The Atlanta Hawks and the Orlando Magic in the finals had a fierce rivalry, which was fueled mostly by postseason competitions and the developing prominence of Dwight Howard and Josh Smith, both of whom were drafted in the 2004 NBA draft and nurtured in Georgia.

The two clubs met thrice in the NBA playoffs, in 1996, 2010, and 2011. The Magic defeated the Hawks 4-1 in the second round of the 1996 playoffs and swept the second round series 4-0 in the 2010 playoffs, while the Hawks defeated the Magic 4-2 in the first round of the 2011 playoffs.

Schedule 2022-23

Schedule 2022-23

DATE OPPONENT TIME TV
Thu, Oct 20 vs Detroit 6:00 AM
Sat, Oct 22 vs Atlanta 6:30 AM
Sun, Oct 23 vs Boston 6:00 AM
Tue, Oct 25 vs New York 6:30 AM NBA TV
Thu, Oct 27 vs Cleveland 6:00 AM
Sat, Oct 29 vs Charlotte 6:00 AM
Mon, Oct 31 vs Dallas 6:30 AM
Wed, Nov 2 vs Oklahoma City 6:30 AM TNT
Fri, Nov 4 vs Golden State 6:00 AM
Sun, Nov 6 vs Sacramento 4:00 AM
Tue, Nov 8 vs Houston 7:15 AM
Thu, Nov 10 vs Dallas 7:00 AM
Sat, Nov 12 vs Phoenix 7:00 AM
Tue, Nov 15 vs Charlotte 7:00 AM
Thu, Nov 17 vs Minnesota 7:00 AM
Sat, Nov 19 vs Chicago 8:00 AM
Sun, Nov 20 vs Indiana 7:00 AM
Tue, Nov 22 vs Indiana 7:00 AM
Sat, Nov 26 vs Philadelphia 7:00 AM
Mon, Nov 28 vs Philadelphia 6:00 AM
Tue, Nov 29 vs Brooklyn 7:30 AM
Thu, Dec 1 vs Atlanta 7:00 AM
Sat, Dec 3 vs Cleveland 7:30 AM
Sun, Dec 4 vs Toronto 8:00 AM
Tue, Dec 6 vs Milwaukee 7:00 AM
Thu, Dec 8 vs LA 7:00 AM
Sat, Dec 10 vs Toronto 7:00 AM
Mon, Dec 12 vs Toronto 6:00 AM
Thu, Dec 15 vs Atlanta 7:00 AM
Sat, Dec 17 vs Boston 7:30 AM
Mon, Dec 19 vs Boston 3:00 AM
Tue, Dec 20 vs Atlanta 7:30 AM
Thu, Dec 22 vs Houston 8:00 AM
Sat, Dec 24 vs San Antonio 7:00 AM
Wed, Dec 28 vs Los Angeles 7:00 AM
Thu, Dec 29 vs Detroit 7:00 AM
Sat, Dec 31 vs Washington 7:00 AM
Thu, Jan 5 vs Oklahoma City 7:00 AM
Fri, Jan 6 vs Memphis 7:00 AM
Sun, Jan 8 vs Golden State 8:30 AM
Tue, Jan 10 vs Sacramento 10:00 AM
Wed, Jan 11 vs Portland 10:00 AM
Sat, Jan 14 vs Utah 9:00 AM
Mon, Jan 16 vs Denver 8:00 AM
Sat, Jan 21 vs New Orleans 7:00 AM
Sun, Jan 22 vs Washington 7:00 AM
Tue, Jan 24 vs Boston 7:00 AM
Thu, Jan 26 vs Indiana 7:00 AM
Sat, Jan 28 vs Miami 8:00 AM
Sun, Jan 29 vs Chicago 7:00 AM
Tue, Jan 31 vs Philadelphia 7:00 AM
Thu, Feb 2 vs Philadelphia 7:00 AM
Sat, Feb 4 vs Minnesota 8:00 AM
Mon, Feb 6 vs Charlotte 1:00 AM
Wed, Feb 8 vs New York 7:00 AM
Fri, Feb 10 vs Denver 7:00 AM
Sun, Feb 12 vs Miami 7:00 AM
Tue, Feb 14 vs Chicago 8:00 AM
Wed, Feb 15 vs Toronto 7:30 AM
Fri, Feb 24 vs Detroit 7:00 AM
Sun, Feb 26 vs Indiana 7:00 AM
Tue, Feb 28 vs New Orleans 8:00 AM
Thu, Mar 2 vs Milwaukee 8:00 AM
Sat, Mar 4 vs Charlotte 7:00 AM
Mon, Mar 6 vs Portland 6:00 AM
Wed, Mar 8 vs Milwaukee 7:00 AM
Fri, Mar 10 vs Utah 7:00 AM
Sun, Mar 12 vs Miami 7:00 AM
Wed, Mar 15 vs San Antonio 7:00 AM
Fri, Mar 17 vs Phoenix 9:00 AM NBA TV
Sun, Mar 19 vs LA 2:00 AM
Mon, Mar 20 vs Los Angeles 8:30 AM
Wed, Mar 22 vs Washington 6:00 AM
Fri, Mar 24 vs New York 6:00 AM NBA TV
Mon, Mar 27 vs Brooklyn 5:00 AM
Wed, Mar 29 vs Memphis 7:00 AM
Sat, Apr 1 vs Washington 6:00 AM
Mon, Apr 3 vs Detroit 5:00 AM
Wed, Apr 5 vs Cleveland 6:00 AM
Fri, Apr 7 vs Cleveland 6:00 AM
Sat, Apr 8 vs Brooklyn 6:30 AM
Mon, Apr 10 vs Miami 12:00 AM

Orlando Magic Roster

NAME POS AGE HT WT COLLEGE SALARY
Cole Anthony 50 PG 22 6′ 3″ 185 lbs North Carolina $3,613,680
Mo Bamba 5 C 24 7′ 0″ 231 lbs Texas $10,300,000
Paolo Banchero F 19 6′ 10″ 250 lbs Duke $11,055,120
Bol Bol 10 C 22 7′ 2″ 220 lbs Oregon $2,200,000
Ignas Brazdeikis 17 SF 23 6′ 6″ 221 lbs Michigan
Devin Cannady 30 G 26 6′ 1″ 190 lbs Princeton $1,752,638
Wendell Carter Jr. 34 C 23 6′ 10″ 270 lbs Duke $14,150,000
Markelle Fultz 20 PG 24 6′ 4″ 209 lbs Washington $16,500,000
R.J. Hampton 13 PG 21 6′ 6″ 190 lbs $2,412,840
Gary Harris 14 SG 27 6′ 4″ 210 lbs Michigan State $13,000,000
Kevon Harris G 25 6′ 6″ 216 lbs Stephen F. Austin
Caleb Houstan F 19 6′ 8″ 205 lbs Michigan $2,000,000
Jonathan Isaac 1 PF 24 6′ 10″ 230 lbs Florida State $17,400,000
Chuma Okeke 3 PF 23 6′ 6″ 229 lbs Auburn $3,433,320
Terrence Ross 31 SG 31 6′ 6″ 206 lbs Washington $11,500,000
Admiral Schofield 25 SF 25 6′ 5″ 241 lbs Tennessee
Jalen Suggs 4 SG 21 6′ 5″ 205 lbs Gonzaga $6,922,320
Franz Wagner 22 SF 20 6′ 10″ 220 lbs Michigan $5,258,280
Moritz Wagner 21 C 25 6′ 11″ 245 lbs Michigan $1,878,720

Stats 2021-22

Stats 2021-22

Player Stats – All Splits

NAME GP GS MIN PTS OR DR REB AST STL BLK TO PF AST/TO PER
Cole Anthony PG 65 65 31.7 16.3 0.5 4.9 5.4 5.7 0.7 0.3 2.6 2.6 2.2 13.55
Franz Wagner SF 79 79 30.7 15.2 1.1 3.4 4.5 2.9 0.9 0.4 1.5 2.1 1.9 14.75
Wendell Carter Jr. C 62 61 29.9 15.0 2.2 8.2 10.5 2.8 0.6 0.7 1.9 2.7 1.5 18.41
Jalen Suggs SG 48 45 27.2 11.8 0.5 3.0 3.6 4.4 1.2 0.4 3.0 3.0 1.5 8.66
Gary Harris SG 61 30 28.4 11.1 0.6 1.4 2.0 1.8 1.0 0.1 1.0 1.8 1.8 10.89
Markelle Fultz PG 18 3 20.0 10.8 0.2 2.5 2.7 5.5 1.1 0.3 2.2 1.2 2.5 17.75
Mo Bamba C 71 69 25.7 10.6 2.1 6.0 8.1 1.2 0.5 1.7 1.1 2.6 1.1 16.50
Devin Cannady G 5 29.0 10.0 0.2 1.0 1.2 2.0 1.0 0.6 1.0 1.8 2.0 8.66
Terrence Ross SG 63 23.0 10.0 0.3 2.2 2.6 1.8 0.4 0.2 1.2 1.1 1.5 10.07
Moritz Wagner C 63 3 15.2 9.0 0.7 3.0 3.7 1.4 0.3 0.2 0.9 2.0 1.6 18.13
Chuma Okeke PF 70 20 25.0 8.6 0.7 4.3 5.0 1.7 1.4 0.6 0.8 1.4 2.1 12.08
R.J. Hampton PG 64 14 21.9 7.6 0.4 2.7 3.0 2.5 0.7 0.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 8.56
Robin Lopez C 36 9 17.0 7.1 1.9 1.6 3.5 1.5 0.1 0.5 1.2 1.9 1.2 13.73
BJ Johnson F 4 16.3 6.5 1.5 2.3 3.8 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 1.0 0.0 12.15
Hassani Gravett PG 8 3 21.4 6.3 0.1 2.5 2.6 2.5 0.6 0.1 1.1 1.6 2.2 10.10
Ignas Brazdeikis SF 42 1 12.8 5.0 0.5 1.2 1.7 0.9 0.2 0.1 0.4 1.1 2.2 10.30
Admiral Schofield SF 38 1 12.3 3.8 0.4 1.9 2.3 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.6 1.5 1.2 7.56
Tim Frazier PG * 10 3 20.0 3.7 0.5 1.4 1.9 3.3 0.3 0.1 1.3 2.4 2.5 3.86
Mychal Mulder G * 15 2 13.0 3.7 0.1 1.3 1.4 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.5 0.8 0.4 2.15
Jeff Dowtin G * 4 19.3 3.3 1.8 1.0 2.8 1.8 1.3 0.0 1.0 0.8 1.8 6.53
Aleem Ford F 5 14.8 2.8 0.4 2.6 3.0 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.8 1.4 0.5 0.50
Freddie Gillespie SF 9 2 13.2 2.3 1.4 2.6 4.0 0.6 0.3 1.0 0.6 2.0 1.0 9.47
Total 82 104.2 9.1 35.2 44.3 23.7 6.8 4.5 13.8 19.7 1.7
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Shooting Stats – All Splits

NAME FGM FGA FG% 3PM 3PA 3P% FTM FTA FT% 2PM 2PA 2P% SC-EFF SH-EFF
Cole Anthony PG 5.5 14.0 39.1 2.0 6.0 33.8 3.3 3.9 85.4 3.5 8.0 43.2 1.164 0.46
Franz Wagner SF 5.8 12.3 46.8 1.2 3.4 35.4 2.4 2.8 86.3 4.6 8.9 51.1 1.228 0.52
Wendell Carter Jr. C 5.8 11.0 52.5 1.1 3.5 32.7 2.3 3.3 69.1 4.7 7.6 61.5 1.361 0.58
Jalen Suggs SG 4.1 11.4 36.1 0.9 4.1 21.4 2.6 3.4 77.3 3.3 7.3 44.3 1.029 0.40
Gary Harris SG 3.9 9.1 43.4 1.9 5.0 38.4 1.4 1.6 87.4 2.0 4.1 49.4 1.228 0.54
Markelle Fultz PG 4.6 9.7 47.4 0.2 0.9 23.5 1.4 1.7 80.6 4.4 8.8 50.0 1.114 0.49
Mo Bamba C 4.2 8.7 48.0 1.5 4.0 38.1 0.8 1.0 78.1 2.7 4.7 56.3 1.225 0.57
Devin Cannady G 3.0 8.8 34.1 3.0 7.4 40.5 1.0 1.4 71.4 0.0 1.4 0.0 1.136 0.51
Terrence Ross SG 3.5 8.8 39.7 1.2 4.2 29.2 1.8 2.1 86.2 2.3 4.6 49.3 1.135 0.47
Moritz Wagner C 3.1 6.3 49.7 1.0 3.2 32.8 1.7 2.0 80.6 2.1 3.1 67.2 1.424 0.58
Chuma Okeke PF 3.1 8.2 37.6 1.7 5.3 31.8 0.8 0.9 84.6 1.4 2.9 48.0 1.052 0.48
R.J. Hampton PG 2.7 7.1 38.3 1.0 2.9 35.0 1.2 1.8 64.1 1.7 4.3 40.5 1.070 0.45
Robin Lopez C 3.1 5.5 55.3 0.1 0.2 33.3 0.9 1.5 59.3 3.0 5.4 56.0 1.276 0.56
BJ Johnson F 2.8 6.3 44.0 1.0 2.5 40.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.8 3.8 46.7 1.040 0.52
Hassani Gravett PG 2.3 4.8 47.4 1.4 3.3 42.3 0.4 0.5 75.0 0.9 1.5 58.3 1.316 0.62
Ignas Brazdeikis SF 1.9 4.5 43.1 0.6 2.1 31.0 0.5 0.8 65.6 1.3 2.4 53.5 1.117 0.50
Admiral Schofield SF 1.4 3.4 41.9 0.7 2.1 32.9 0.3 0.4 80.0 0.7 1.3 56.0 1.132 0.52
Tim Frazier PG * 1.3 4.3 30.2 0.6 1.7 35.3 0.5 0.9 55.6 0.7 2.6 26.9 860 0.37
Mychal Mulder G * 1.3 4.5 29.9 0.9 3.1 28.3 0.1 0.1 100.0 0.5 1.4 33.3 821 0.40
Jeff Dowtin G * 1.3 4.8 26.3 0.3 1.8 14.3 0.5 0.5 100.0 1.0 3.0 33.3 684 0.29
Aleem Ford F 1.2 4.0 30.0 0.4 3.0 13.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 1.0 80.0 700 0.35
Freddie Gillespie SF 1.0 2.4 40.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.8 42.9 1.0 2.3 42.9 955 0.41
Total 38.3 88.3 43.4 12.2 36.9 33.1 15.5 19.7 78.7 26.1 51.4 50.7 1.181 0.50

FAQs

Why is the Orlando Magic called the Magic?

As a result, the Orlando Sentinel conducted a contest in which fans could vote on the name of the future franchise. A total of 4,296 entries were submitted, and when a committee was formed to analyze them, four names emerged as finalists: “Heat,” “Tropics,” “Juice,” and “Magic.”

Who are the Orlando Magic rivals?

The Heat-Magic rivalry is between the Miami Heat and the Orlando Magic championships NBA in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Similar to the Lakers-Clippers rivalry, it is also known as the Sunshine State rivalry because both the Heat and the Magic are headquartered in Florida.

The Orlando Magic logo incorporates all three of the team’s official colors: blue, black, and silver. Originally, Pat Williams intended to go with black and gold. Still, the club finally settled on silver and an electric blue made specifically for the Orlando Magic by the MacGregor business.

Is the Orlando Magic rebranding?

Martins stated that the squad will continue to utilize “Magic Together” until the end of the 2021-22 season before switching to a new motto for the 2022-23 season. “The expectation is, and the work that is now being done looking forward, that things will change beyond this season,” Martins added.

Conclusion

After a difficult season, the Orlando Magic are looking to rebuild. They have a young core of players, led by All-Star center Nikola Vucevic. Magic basketball also has a new head coach, Steve Clifford, known for his defensive expertise. The team will look to improve on both ends of the court next season. Thanks for reading this article.